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November 2016
November 2016 Complete Issue - PDF Download
Saturday, November 5th, 2016

Features
21 | Receipt of Incriminating Evidence and the Need for Protection - By Keith Hampton
28 | Avoiding the One-Eyed Expert and Handling the Others - By Hilary Sheard
36 | The Long Hot Summer—Dilley Style - By Judge Pat Priest

Columns
6 | President's Message

Receipt of Incriminating Evidence and the Need for Protection
Saturday, November 5th, 2016

Texas criminal defense lawyers who have received physical evidence incriminating their clients are in an ethical no-man’s-land and vulnerable to prosecution. There is currently no clear ethical rule to guide the defense lawyer and no real protection from being used as a law enforcement tool against your own client.

Avoiding the One-Eyed Expert and Handling the Others
Saturday, November 5th, 2016

In the early 1990s, when I was a law student, I worked on an appeal from the re-sentencing trial of a Travis County capital murder case, that of David Lee Powell.

The Long Hot Summer—Dilley Style
Saturday, November 5th, 2016

Careful observers of the criminal justice scene in my part of the world note that Federal prosecutors file and pursue a lot more conspiracy prosecutions than do their State court counterparts. Many assume, I believe, that this is because conspiracy prosecutions require special investigative talents found only in the Justice Department and the various Federal investigative agencies.

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