Contributors

Ed Stapleton

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Ed Stapleton received his bachelors from the University of Texas in Plan II and his JD from the University of Texas School of Law in 1975. He has practiced law in Texas since he was licensed in January of 1976 and has accepted appointments to defend indigents since that time. He works with his daughter, Sara, in their firm of Stapleton & Stapleton in Brownsville. Ed served for a time as an Assistant Federal Public Defender in Brownsville and Fort Worth.

Edward Mallett

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Ed Mallett is partner at the law firm of MallettSaper Berg, LLP, in Houston. He is a Past President of the Texas Criminal Defense Lawyers Association, the Harris County Criminal Lawyers Association, and the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers. He is a member of the American Board of Criminal Lawyers and on the faculty at the National Criminal Defense College. His State and Federal cases include acquittals in homicide, drug, and white-collar crime cases.

Emily Munoz Detoto

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Emily Detoto, a graduate of St. Mary’s Law School, serves on the Board of Directors for TCDLA. A briefing attorney at the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals and a former Harris County prosecutor, she’s been honored as H Texas magazine’s best lawyers, 2004 & 2005, and Texas Monthly magazine’s Texas Rising Stars: 2004–2005, 2008–2009, and 2011. Emily has appeared on “Inside Edition,” “Primetime Live,” “Celebrity Justice,” “Anderson Cooper,” “Good Morning America,” and various national news media outlets.

Emmett Harris

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A resident of Uvalde, Emmett Harris has primarily practiced criminal defense for the last 35 years. Twice president of the Uvalde County Bar Association and past president of the Border District Bar Association, he has served as a member of the Board of Directors and the Executive Committee of TCDLA and has spoken at numerous seminars. He also served as Editor for the organization’s magazine, Voice for the Defense. Emmett has previously served as Secretary, Treasurer, Second Vice President, and First Vice President of TCDLA.

F. R. Buck Files, Jr.

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Buck Files, a member of TCDLA’s Hall of Fame and the President of the State Bar of Texas, practices in Tyler, Texas, with the law firm Bain, Files, Jarrett, Bain & Harrison, PC.

Fernando Dubove

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Fernando Dubove received his B.A. and J.D. from the University of Texas at Austin. In 1987, he served as Assistant Director in Texas for a Washington, D.C.-based immigrant and refugee rights organization. He served as the staff trial attorney for the Diocesan Migrant and Refugee Services in El Paso. He is now in private practice with offices in Dallas and Tyler.

Floyd L. Jennings

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Floyd L. Jennings, JD, PhD, ABPP, is a Diplomate in Clinical Psychology, as well as an attorney. Presently Chief, Misdemeanor Mental Health Division of the Harris County Public Defender, he was in private practice of clinical psychology for over 30 years and for some 20 years was on the clinical faculty member of UT Medical School–Houston. He is the author of over 35 publications, largely dealing with legal and ethical matters for mental health practitioners.

Frank E. Stevenson

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Frank E. Stevenson, President-elect of State Bar of Texas, is a partner in the Dallas office of Locke Lord, LLP. He chaired the State Bar’s Board of Directors in 2012–13 when Buck Files was State Bar President.

Frank Sellers

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Frank Sellers is the newest partner at Hurley, Guinn & Sellers, based in Lubbock, Texas. He handles both postconviction and trial cases, with a heavy emphasis on DWI defense. He is a TCDLA Board member, President-Elect of the Lubbock Criminal Defense Lawyers Association, and a founding member of the DUI Defense Lawyers Association. Sellers graduated from Texas A&M and then Texas Tech Law School, where he was an editor on the Law Review, on the Board of Barristers, and selected for numerous national mock trial teams.

George Roland III

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George Roland is a criminal defense lawyer in Denton, Texas, who primarily handles drug cases. George recently had a motion to suppress hearing where a University detective and four other cops from the Drug Task Force had forced their way into a student’s apartment without consent or a warrant, citing imminent destruction of evidence. Not so, said the Court. George does what he does for Roo.