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January/February 2017
January/February 2017 Complete Issue - PDF Download
Wednesday, January 25th, 2017
Features
27 | Forensic Science in Criminal Courts: The PCAST Report - By Walter Reaves
31 | A Thorn in the Side of Forensic DNA: Complex Mixtures - By Lydia McCoy
33 | Lawyers Look Out: Judge May Not Pay for Your Work - By Drew Willey
Forensic Science in Criminal Courts: The PCAST Report
Thursday, January 26th, 2017

In 2015 President Obama tasked his Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST with the job of reviewing the forensic sciences, and determining if there were areas that could be improved. In October of this year they released their report—which has surprisingly generated little press.

A Thorn in the Side of Forensic DNA: Complex Mixtures
Thursday, January 26th, 2017

The consultants are discussing your case. They are vigorously proclaiming how the case falls short, and you are feeling like a sure win is in the bag. Then you ask them how should we go at them in trial. It’s then that you hear things in a deflated tone like, “Well, what they did isn’t wrong, just not how I would have done it.” What happened to the fervor?

Lawyers Look Out: Judge May Not Pay for Your Work
Thursday, January 26th, 2017

If you take court-appointed cases, you know how to turn in a voucher requesting funds for your work. How often do you feel the pay you receive is adequate compensation for your work?

Who Killed These Girls? Cold Case: The Yogurt Shop Murders
Thursday, January 26th, 2017

Who Killed These Girls? is a true story about Austin criminal defense lawyers fighting to save three defendants—Robert Springsteen Jr., Michael Scott, and Maurice Pierce—from death sentences resulting from false confessions.

The 10,000-Year Capital Case
Thursday, January 26th, 2017

I met the late Clarence Williams in 1972, when we were both involved as court-appointed lawyers for a defendant who was charged with the murder of a police officer.

Look Here: 4th Amendment Musings - Jan2017
Thursday, January 26th, 2017

Our ever-growing digital society has made non-reliance on technology almost impossible. There is an application that applies to every facet of life. With one swipe, a person can access millions of photos, bank information, years of dialogue, and so much more.

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