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June 2019
June 2019 Complete Issue - PDF Download
Tuesday, June 4th, 2019
Features
22 | Blood Pattern Analysis: Esoteric Science, Quotidian Skill, or Deceptive Practice? - By Louis Akin
28 | Representation of Mentally Impaired Clients: An Ethical Issue - By Floyd L. Jennings
32 | Protecting Your Flank: What is a record and how to make sure your argument is preserved for appeal - By Clifford P. W. Duke
Blood Pattern Analysis: Esoteric  Science, Quotidian Skill, or  Deceptive Practice?
Tuesday, June 4th, 2019

Too many false allegations have been offered in the name of science and too many people have suffered serious damage—even life-long damage—as a result. It is time to put all of this to an end.

Representation of Mentally Impaired Clients: An Ethical Issue
Tuesday, June 4th, 2019

Scenario

Consider the following scenario, which is all too common: A defendant is arrested and is obviously mentally ill upon arrest, as well as having a long mental health history.

Protecting Your Flank What is a record and how to make sure your argument is preserved for appeal.
Tuesday, June 4th, 2019

Nobody wants a one-word verdict at trial. But as bad as a “guilty” at trial is the one-word verdict on your brilliant appellate argument: waiver. If it’s not preserved, it’s not going to win the day for your client.

The Ultimate Mistrial: A War Story
Tuesday, June 4th, 2019

Anyone who has tried cases to a jury has at one time or another had a mistrial. I recall a time when I tried a murder case involving a very young man who shot another student to take a sports jacket. Sad case, but I needed something to shake the state up and get a better offer. No such offer ever came, and I prepared for trial.

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